KRRC to Build New Water Infrastructure for City of Yreka

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 9, 2020

CONTACT: Matt Cox, KRRC
(916) 847-6459 (cell)
matt@klamathrenewal.org

KLAMATH BASIN – The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC), in coordination with the City of Yreka, has selected the final design for a new, state-of-the-art water line for the City. The entire anticipated cost of the $4 million project will be paid for by KRRC.

Matt Cox, KRRC Director of Communications, noted that this robust and upgraded water line will replace the aging line that would be impacted by the removal of Iron Gate Dam.

“The water line replacement project will be constructed prior to dam removal, and there will be no interruption to the Yreka water supply,” said Cox. “KRRC has  committed from the very beginning of our project to leave local infrastructure, such as roads and bridges, in as good or better shape than we found them. This new water line is an example of our commitment to fulfilling that promise. The current water line would have eventually needed  replacement even without the KRRC project, so City residents are receiving a very substantial benefit.”

The design includes a waterline relocation attached to a pipe bridge over the Klamath River. The design will accommodate stringent seismic and flood criteria. Appropriately designed ballistic and other protections will be a key part of the design, and the pipe bridge solution will allow for future ease of maintenance compared to the existing pipe, which runs along the bottom of the reservoir.

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The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) is an independent nonprofit organization founded in 2016 as part of the amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). KRRC is part of a cooperative effort to re-establish the natural vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin. Signatories of the amended KHSA incude the states of California and Oregon, local governments, tribal nations, dam owner PacifiCorp, irrigators, and several conservation and fishing groups. KRRC was formed for the sole purpose of taking ownership of four PacifiCorp dams — J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate – and then removing these dams, restoring formerly inundated lands, and implementing required mitigation measures in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. KRRC’s work is funded by PacifiCorp customer surcharges and California Proposition 1 water bond funds.

KRRC values transparency and cooperation with all stakeholders and is committed to working with residents and governments to minimize any nuisance or negative impacts while enhancing the project’s local benefits.

Klamath Dam Removal Moves Forward as KRRC Makes Critical Submission to FERC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 29, 2019

CONTACT: Matt Cox, KRRC
(916) 847-6459 (cell)
matt@klamathrenewal.org

KLAMATH BASIN – Today, in a filing to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) answered important,  substantive questions FERC asked to evaluate KRRC’s capacity to become licensee for the Lower Klamath Project (Project) and remove the four dams on the Klamath River. This submission to FERC is another concrete step toward fulfilling the terms of the Amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA), removing the dams and restoring a free-flowing Klamath River.

“This is a project of vast importance for the environment, the river, and the people and communities in the Klamath Basin,” said Mark Bransom, KRRC Chief Executive Officer. “Our submission to FERC today proves that we understand the magnitude of our charge and are on the right path. We have the funding, the team, the expertise and the plan to do it right and pen a vibrant new chapter of Klamath River history. We want to particularly underscore the years of effort by tribal communities who truly laid the foundation for where we are today.”

In 2016, KRRC submitted license transfer and surrender applications to FERC, both of which are necessary for KRRC to take ownership of the four lower Klamath dams, remove them, and restore the river. In 2018, KRRC submitted to FERC its “Definite Plan,” a comprehensive, 2,800-page document that covered every aspect of its proposal, including plans for facilities removal, site remediation and restoration, estimated cost, and risk mitigation.

As part of the review process for KRRC’s Definite Plan, FERC directed KRRC to convene an independent Board of Consultants (BOC) to analyze KRRC’s work and provide feedback and suggestions. The BOC comprises experts in dam construction and removal, engineering, aquatic and terrestrial biology, construction cost estimating, insurance, and bonding for large infrastructure projects. BOCs are common for large projects in FERC’s purview.

In late December 2018, the BOC released its suggestions and questions regarding the Definite Plan to KRRC, and KRRC has spent the past seven months refining and strengthening aspects of the Definite Plan to reflect the BOC input, leading to today’s supplemental submission. The result is a compelling, comprehensive approach and proof of KRRC’s capacity for FERC to consider as it deliberates on license transfer and surrender.

Specifically, in the new filing, KRRC demonstrated that its committed funds are sufficient to complete dam removal as proposed in the license surrender application. This updated cost estimate reflects refinements to prior cost-estimate work completed by the federal Bureau of Reclamation, simulation of tens-of-thousands of scenarios that could affect costs, and incorporation of expert BOC input. The new, “P80” cost estimate for full dam removal is $434 million, well within KRRC’s $450 million budget. P80 is an industry standard for cost estimating that assumes 80-percent of a project’s identified risks will occur over the life of the project. The $434 million figure also includes significant contingency funding to provide a substantial buffer for any additional project costs.

In addition, KRRC has developed the most comprehensive risk management program ever considered by FERC for purposes of dam removal. The risk package includes insurance, performance bond, and indemnity coverages to offset potential short- and long-term project effects.

KRRC has also engaged a world-class, best-in-business team to ensure its capacity as licensee, including technical consultant AECOM, with a global track record of cost estimation of complex construction projects; Kiewit Infrastructure West, which possesses a history of successfully completing large and challenging water resources projects; risk management expert AON, which creates risk solutions across all industry sectors; and Resource Environmental Solutions, the nation’s leader in long-term environmental mitigation and management of associated liabilities. 

“The KHSA represents years of negotiations, exhaustive scientific study, and compromise among the many groups who are all working together for a robust Klamath River and Basin,” said Bransom. “Healthy rivers breathe life into the communities they touch. Dam removal and a revitalized Klamath River will enhance resiliency to strengthen the entire Basin for the future.”

FERC will decide on the KRRC license transfer and surrender applications. KRRC anticipates beginning drawdown and removal as early as 2022, pending action by FERC and other regulators.

To view the KRRC filing, visit: www.klamathrenewal.org/definite-plan.

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The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) is an independent nonprofit organization founded in 2016 as part of the amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). KRRC is part of a cooperative effort to re-establish the natural vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin. Signatories of the amended KHSA incude the states of California and Oregon, local governments, tribal nations, dam owner PacifiCorp, irrigators, and several conservation and fishing groups. KRRC was formed for the sole purpose of taking ownership of four PacifiCorps dams — J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate – and then removing these dams, restoring formerly inundated lands, and implementing required mitigation measures in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. KRRC’s work is funded by PacifiCorp customer surcharges and California Proposition 1 water bond funds.

KRRC values transparency and cooperation with all stakeholders and is committed to working with residents and governments to minimize any nuisance or negative impacts while enhancing the project’s local benefits.

KRRC and Kiewit Name RES as Lead Restoration Contractor on Klamath Dam Removal Project

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 24, 2019

CONTACT: Matt Cox, KRRC
(916) 847-6459 (cell)
matt@klamathrenewal.org

Michael Hare, RES
(225) 772-2643
mhare@res.us

KLAMATH BASIN – Today, the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC), along with lead contractor Kiewit, continue progress toward fulfilling the terms of the Amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA) dam removal and restoring a free-flowing Klamath River by selecting Resource Environmental Solutions, LLC (RES) as project restoration subcontractor. Under the current award, RES has been added to the team to take a leadership role in the restoration design and planning, with the goal of RES leading the restoration following the completion of design.

“We could not ask for a better partner than RES to undertake the vital environmental restoration that is a key part of this landmark project. They have the proven experience and expertise needed to ensure success,” said Mark Bransom, KRRC Chief Executive Officer.

RES is a nationally recognized leader in environmental restoration and water quality improvement projects. Recently, RES has undertaken a significant permittee-responsible mitigation project restoring approximately 17,000 acres into a functioning native ecosystem for the North Texas Municipal Water District. RES enables turnkey environmental solutions ranging from initial site planning, design, construction (restoration), and long-term stewardship. After a decade of operation, the team has worked across nearly 20 states, improving more than 300 miles of streams, restoring more than 50,000 acres, and planting more than 15,000,000 trees.

“By returning our nation’s rivers to their natural condition, these projects enable large-scale restoration to occur, which provide significant benefits to the local community while enhancing the surrounding ecosystems,” said Elliott Bouillion, RES, President and CEO. “We are excited to work with KRRC, Kiewit, and agencies to evaluate the environmental restoration elements to ensure a timely and durable solution is in place for the community.”

RES is known for integrating long-term stewardship into its restoration designs and has extensive experience addressing potential liabilities associated with challenging, large-scale projects. Given the complexity of a project this size, RES will ensure the restoration plan provides the necessary adaptive management to ensure the permit requirements are achieved as the river returns to its natural state.

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The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) is an independent nonprofit organization founded in 2016 as part of the amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). KRRC is part of a cooperative effort to re-establish the natural vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin. Signatories of the amended KHSA incude the states of California and Oregon, local governments, tribal nations, dam owner PacifiCorp, irrigators, and several conservation and fishing groups. KRRC was formed for the sole purpose of taking ownership of four PacifiCorps dams — J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate – and then removing these dams, restoring formerly inundated lands, and implementing required mitigation measures in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. KRRC’s work is funded by PacifiCorp customer surcharges and California Proposition 1 water bond funds.

KRRC values transparency and cooperation with all stakeholders and is committed to working with residents and governments to minimize any nuisance or negative impacts while enhancing the project’s local benefits.

Klamath River Renewal Corporation Awards Kiewit Milestone Construction Contract for Dam Removal

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 25, 2019

CONTACT: Matt Cox
(916) 847-6459 (cell)
matt@klamathrenewal.org

KLAMATH BASIN – Yesterday, the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) took a major step toward dam removal and creating a free-flowing Klamath River by entering into a dam removal design-build contract with construction firm Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. of Fairfield, California. The initial award authorizes $18.1 million in preliminary services, with a further award for project implementation work to follow once design is finalized.

“Selecting Kiewit marks another key achievement and brings KRRC closer to completing the largest dam removal and river restoration project in U.S. history. This contract will help demonstrate KRRC’s capacity to undertake the project consistent with a license transfer application pending before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission,” said Mark Bransom, KRRC Chief Executive Officer. “Once implemented, the project will help restore the vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin.”

Kiewit has extensive experience in major construction projects, most recently the emergency reconstruction of the Oroville Dam spillways, which involved removal and repair of both the main flood control and emergency spillways in less than 18 months as well extensive debris and sediment removal, development of access roads and other work. Kiewit has also undertaken relevant projects such as the Folsom Dam Spillway Construction (Phases II & IV), East Toba and Montrose Hydroelectric Design Build and the Kwalsa and Upper Stave Hydroelectric Design Build.

Kiewit has assigned Knight Piesold as the lead designer of the KRRC project. The selection of the restoration contractor will be forthcoming.

“We are very proud to have been selected by KRRC. This project has many similarities to other complex water and hydroelectric projects we’ve delivered across North America,” said Jamie Wisenbaker, senior vice president, Kiewit Infrastructure West Co. “We fully understand the breadth and importance of this undertaking and are excited and committed to safely delivering a high-quality project that meets the expectations of KRRC, the community and all key stakeholders in the region. We look forward to partnering with KRRC and getting started.”

Under this agreement, Kiewit will utilize the Progressive Design-Build (PDB) delivery method, assuming responsibility for both the design and execution of dam removal and river restoration, to be completed across two phases.

The preliminary services phase will include design, planning, permitting support, native seed bank development, and other preparation for the later drawdown of the reservoirs. This work will begin immediately. 

The project implementation phase will be awarded to Kiewit at the end of the preliminary services phase, beginning with pre-drawdown work including dam modifications for drawdown of the reservoirs, road and bridge access improvements to accommodate construction vehicle traffic, and bridge and culvert improvements to accommodate new river and creek geometry.

Following the reservoir drawdown, project implementation will focus on dam and hydropower facilities removal, recreation facilities removal, creation of new recreation facilities, and restoration of formerly inundated land and other disturbed areas.

The project implementation phase is contingent on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s approval of license transfer and license surrender, as well as other regulatory permits.

Early in the preliminary services process, Kiewit will study the project site and develop a detailed project design, including obtaining competitive bids for various elements of the work. With this information, KRRC and Kiewit will agree on a final “Guaranteed Maximum Price” (GMP) for all project implementation work. The GMP ensures that the contractor will be responsible for absorbing cost overruns, protecting the ratepayers and taxpayers who are funding this project.

On the current schedule, it is expected that Kiewit will complete due diligence and submit a GMP based on 60-percent design by January 2020.

The PDB contract requires that local and tribal businesses and individuals have the opportunity to participate, and to increase the number of ways that this project will benefit the surrounding communities and local economy.

“For many years, local tribes have been saying ‘bring the salmon home.’ They have advocated passionately for this project,” said Lester Snow, KRRC Board President. “KRRC wishes to acknowledge the enormous and effective work of countless tribal members who truly laid the foundation for this project.”

“Kiewit has every technical skill in the world to get the job done, but beyond that, they just feel like the right fit,” said Bransom. “Kiewit also comes to the project with relevant experience, including with the states of California and Oregon, as well as PacifiCorp (a Berkshire Hathaway Energy company), through successfully completed construction projects as well as other business relationships.”

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The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) is an independent nonprofit organization founded in 2016 as part of the amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). KRRC is part of a cooperative effort to re-establish the natural vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin. Signatories of the amended KHSA incude the states of California and Oregon, local governments, tribal nations, dam owner PacifiCorp, irrigators, and several conservation and fishing groups. KRRC was formed for the sole purpose of taking ownership of four PacifiCorps dams — J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate – and then removing these dams, restoring formerly inundated lands, and implementing required mitigation measures in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. KRRC’s work is funded by PacifiCorp customer surcharges and California Proposition 1 water bond funds.

KRRC values transparency and cooperation with all stakeholders and is committed to working with residents and governments to minimize any nuisance or negative impacts while enhancing the project’s local benefits.

KRRC CEO Mark Bransom Issues Statement on Release of Lower Klamath Project Draft Environmental Impact Report

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 28, 2018

CONTACT: Molly Croll
(530) 840-7373
molly@klamathrenewal.org

KLAMATH BASIN – Mark Bransom, Chief Executive Officer for the Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC), issued the following statement in response to the December 27 release of the California State Water Resources Control Board’s (SWRCB) Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) for removal of the Klamath River dams in California.

“This draft report is a key step to completing this critical project and rehabilitating one of the great rivers of the American west. It’s a sign of meaningful progress and I look forward to a thorough KRRC review of the report and its proposals.

“KRRC is pleased that after considering the full range of project benefits and impacts, the DEIR looked favorably on the Proposed Project.

“As the designated lead agency for the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) on the Klamath project, the SWRCB must conduct this CEQA analysis before it can issue a final Clean Water Act Section 401 permit to the KRRC for removal of the three dams in California. The 401 permit is one of several regulatory permits and approvals KRRC requires to proceed with dam removal, in addition to FERC’s approval of KRRC’s applications for transfer and surrender of the hydroelectric license.”

The DEIR evaluates potential environmental impacts of the Lower Klamath Project and includes proposed measures to avoid, mitigate, or offset those impacts. The DEIR will be available for public review and comment until February 26, 2019. SWRCB will evaluate and consider all responses and comments as it develops its final EIR, which is expected to be released in Summer 2019.

A complete copy of the DEIR is available at www.klamathrenewal.org/deir/.

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The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) is an independent nonprofit organization founded in 2016 as part of the amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). KRRC is part of a cooperative effort to re-establish the natural vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin. Signatories of the amended KHSA incude the states of California and Oregon, local governments, tribal nations, dam owner PacifiCorp, irrigators, and several conservation and fishing groups. KRRC was formed for the sole purpose of taking ownership of four PacifiCorps dams — J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate – and then removing these dams, restoring formerly inundated lands, and implementing required mitigation measures in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. KRRC’s work is funded by PacifiCorp customer surcharges and California Proposition 1 water bond funds.

KRRC values transparency and cooperation with all stakeholders and is committed to working with residents and governments to minimize any nuisance or negative impacts while enhancing the project’s local benefits.

Removal Effort for Klamath River Dam Achieves Major Milestone with Issuance of Oregon Water Quality Certification

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 10, 2018

CONTACT: Molly Croll
(530) 840-7373
molly@klamathrenewal.org

KLAMATH BASIN – The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) on September 7 issued its final Clean Water Act Section 401 Water Quality Certification for the removal of the J.C. Boyle Dam located in Klamath County, OR, determining that dam removal on the Klamath River is expected to improve water quality, restore a more free-flowing condition and benefit fish populations in the long run. Before issuing the final Certification, ODEQ conducted an extensive evaluation of the existing science on potential impacts to water quality and aquatic species from the proposed dam removal.

“ODEQ’s final Section 401 Water Quality Certification brings KRRC one step closer to fulfilling its mission of returning the river to a more natural state, improving water quality, and restoring fish passage,” said KRRC Chief Executive Officer, Mark Bransom. “This final Certification is a significant milestone for KRRC, as it is one of several major permits and approvals we require to proceed with dam removal.”
The Certification conditionally affirms KRRC’s dam removal project will comply with all water quality standards, limitations, and restrictions set by Oregon law and the federal Clean Water Act (CWA), which requires state governments to certify that anything released into the nation’s waters – including water releases from removal of a hydroelectric project – complies with water quality standards. The certification process included an open and transparent public review process to ensure all interested parties had an opportunity to provide input.

ODEQ stipulated certain mitigation measures and monitoring requirements KRRC must implement as conditions of the Certification. These include the development of plans for water quality management; measures to protect fish passage, suckers, and the western pond turtle; reservoir area management; remaining facilities and site restoration; erosion and sediment control; spill responses; waste disposal; and others. Throughout the project, KRRC will provide water quality monitoring data and all required compliance reporting to ODEQ.

The J.C. Boyle hydroelectric development is part of the Lower Klamath Project that also includes the Copco No. 1, Copco No. 2, and Iron Gate facilities in Siskiyou County, California. The ODEQ Section 401 Water Quality Certification specifically addresses the proposed actions located in Oregon. The California State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) will address the removal of the facilities located in California under a separate water quality certification. KRRC anticipates it will receive a final certification from the SWRCB in 2019. In addition, KRRC will require approvals from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on its applications to transfer and surrender the dam licenses before it can proceed with dam removal. Those applications are pending.

A complete copy of the Certification is located at www.klamathrenewal.org/oregon-water-quality-certification/.

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The Klamath River Renewal Corporation (KRRC) is an independent nonprofit organization founded in 2016 as part of the amended Klamath Hydroelectric Settlement Agreement (KHSA). KRRC is part of a cooperative effort to re-establish the natural vitality of the Klamath River so that it can support all communities in the basin. Signatories of the amended KHSA incude the states of California and Oregon, local governments, tribal nations, dam owner PacifiCorp, irrigators, and several conservation and fishing groups. KRRC was formed for the sole purpose of taking ownership of four PacifiCorps dams — J.C. Boyle, Copco No. 1 & 2, and Iron Gate – and then removing these dams, restoring formerly inundated lands, and implementing required mitigation measures in compliance with all applicable federal, state, and local regulations. KRRC’s work is funded by PacifiCorp customer surcharges and California Proposition 1 water bond funds.

KRRC values transparency and cooperation with all stakeholders and is committed to working with residents and governments to minimize any nuisance or negative impacts while enhancing the project’s local benefits.